St Katharine’s Church

St Katharine's Church

This Danish Lutheran church is located at Saint Katharine’s Precinct, at the north west corner of the Outer Circle, off Albany Street. The Danish Church in London has had a presence in London since 1692. The Royal Danish Embassy played a significant role in negotiations with The Crown Estate, leading to the Danish congregation relocating to the historic St. Katharine’s Church in Regent’s Park in 1952. The nearest London Underground stations are Camden Town or Great Portland Street. The building is the former Anglican chapel of St Katharine’s Hospital, retaining its original dedication to Saint Katharine. It was built in 1826-8. The architect was Ambrose Poynter. It has been Grade II* listed since 1954

From 1696 to 1870 there was a Danish church in Wellclose Square. It was built by Caius Gabriel Cibber who was born in Denmark. His wooden figures of Moses and Saint John the Baptist were taken from the original church and placed in St. Katharine’s.

A hammer test in November 2014 proved that the façade needed a thorough renovation. What was initially a cleaning and masonry repair project turned out to be more complicated than planned. A survey revealed previously hidden gaps at high level in the turrets caused by erosion of the iron structures, posing severe danger of collapse. Restoring structural stability shot to the top priority. A band of brand-new stones is now visible near the top of the turrets, marking the spot where a new steel structure is now securing the turrets. The Danish Church in London appears again a bright and beautiful sight from Regent’s Park. The Bath stone façade has been steam cleaned, stones repaired where needed, all damaged mortar has been repaired, the parapets rebuilt and pinnacles made safe. The renovation received support from the Heritage Lottery Fund (now: The National Lottery).

Over the past few years, the Danish Church has been planning and fundraising for a further major refurbishment project of the church. The project was initiated in the summer of 2017 with donations by the A.P. Møller Foundation, the Queen Margrethe and Prince Henrik’s Fund, The Oak Foundation, the Aage and Johanne Louis-Hansen’s Fund, the Villum Foundation, and others.


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